Periodic Push-in...to the Curriculum!

I've decided {as with most of my decisions} to jump in with both feet and not look back.  Check out my SLPs Pushing In Series here to find out where I started.  Today, I am sharing where I am today.



Yes, I did receive some weird looks as I moved myself into classrooms to observe, chat with a small group of students, offer a strategy, scaffold, or provide a visual cue/prompt.  I reassured the teachers I was NOT observing them, merely I was immersing myself into the curriculum with the hope of gaining new knowledge about my students and hopefully earning a welcome for future returns.  I may just shout from the rooftops, I loved every minute of pushing into classrooms!  In small, controlled doses.  I'm calling it periodic push-in.  I'm not giving up my day job of pull-out speech language therapy.  Therapy is a necessary component for students identified with speech-language impairments.  In my opinion, therapy cannot take place solely in a large classroom setting or even in a small group within a large classroom setting, as I refer to as pull-away services.  Inclusion or push-in services is part of a continuum of service delivery options from which to choose.  A continuum is NECESSARY and so is individual and/or small group speech therapy services in the speech room!

If you want to give periodic push-in a try, I created a freebie for data collection.  You can find it in this post.  So far, most of my push-in times have been unplanned.  Students forgot to come to my room, so I went to their room and found a great activity going on, so I stayed.  A meeting was scheduled during a regular group time, so I pushed into music during my lunch.  Schedule changes created a domino effect, so I went with it...into the classroom.  Testing was going on here, so I went there.  You get the idea!

To offer a little more persuasion in hopes that you might too try periodic push-in, I've decided to take this whole week before winter break to only push into classrooms.  I am completely optimistic that this will be a grand week!  I started by developing a plan to push into classrooms by following my regular pull-out schedule.  Instead of having my students come to me, I will go to them.  This would work even better if my groups of students were only developed with students from one classroom, but that isn't always the case.  I sent out a staff e-mail {scary} and informed them of my decision to push-in, asking each teacher not to change anything.  If an activity throughout the week offered communicative opportunities, then I would be happy to push-in at the time instead.  I promised to bring my flexible brain!

So, I took my regular schedule and shrunk all the names leaving room to write in any invites.  I'm happy to report I have three so far!  I'll be involved in a "buddy" activity in kindergarten, watching some of my students present in a play in 2nd grade, and offering some help with independent studies in 4th grade.  I'm definitely ending the week with productions by our drama club, in which I volunteer to assist weekly as an after school activity.  In between those invites, hearing screening follow-ups, and scattered meetings, I hope to see all 80 of my students this week.

I promise to report successes and failures!  Happy last week before break speechies!



I'm also linking up {late} with Old School Speech's Week in Review since this is what I have planned for my week.  Despite taking tons of pictures last week of all my craftivities in speech, I neglected to include any in a post.  Best laid plans...


6 comments

  1. 80 students...WOW. Can't wait to hear how your week went!
    Thanks for linking up!

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    1. I saw someone on IG that had 88, so I felt better:) I sure will let you know!

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  2. I love this! I do a lot of periodic push ins- though I didn't know what to call it. I like to be in the classroom and observe how my students are doing. I also like the chance to offer some extra services not only to my students, but the teacher as well. It is not an easy feat especially when the child feels cheated because we didn't go the the speech room, but I know that language is not found in a bubble.

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    1. After successfully immersing myself into classrooms for the last 2 days, everything you said is right on. I made some thought bubble notes about suggestions for teachers, learned a great deal about the curriculum and vocabulary that is being used, and really observed my students A LOT! I did have to negotiate and persuade many students that me coming to them was beneficial:) They did feel cheated! I got more direct time with them they even I thought!

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  3. I like the idea of periodic push-in. How do you manage that in terms of schedule? My push-in is scheduled for the same time each week.

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    1. This is totally new to me. In past years, I would only do push-in with some groups, mostly self-contained classrooms or primary centers in K or 1, targeting identified as well as at risk students (in addition to pull-out time). This year we were asked to add a 20% increase of push-in services. I had challenges mostly due to not knowing the students at my new school, but I wanted to try something different. My original thought of periodic push-in was to do 3:1 model (3 weeks pull-out followed by 1 push-in). Although I still may do this, my week of push-in worked well just following my set pull-out schedule. I still met minutes according to IEPs, so in a sense this may have been time above and beyond, but something I may work in for future. I'll be sure to do a follow-up post to give more ideas, but it is a work in progress (isn't everything:)!

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